we are always under the same sky

we are always under the same sky

(via masked-alias)

ilikelookingatnakedmen:

denisiotruitt:

princelesscomic:

lostthehat:

shuraiya:

beatonna:

lecinematheque:

Pumzi - dir. Wanuri Kahiu // Kenya

In a dystopian future 35 years after an ecological WWIII  has torn the world apart, East African survivors of the devastation remain locked away in contained communities, but a young woman in possession of a germinating seed struggles against the governing council to bring the plant to Earth’s ruined surface.

The main character is a museum curator in the future and also yes I would like see this now please

THERE IS NOTHING ABOUT THIS I DON’T LIKE

The complete short film is on youtube and it’s really good and the end kind of took my breath away. 

I must see this

One if my favorite shorts…. So glad its back in rotation

Oooh, I didn’t realise you could watch the whole thing! I’ve only seen the trailer. 

(via holyfant)

onthelosingside:

jennaknowsash:

thememacat:

natanuland:

"Martin has to go up a few steps to be eye level with Ben XD"

And, oh, how he loves to make Ben laugh!

It’s a great power he has.


Martin looks to be mock scolding Ben or something and it makes me v happy. 

Their smiles are electric

onthelosingside:

jennaknowsash:

thememacat:

natanuland:

"Martin has to go up a few steps to be eye level with Ben XD"

And, oh, how he loves to make Ben laugh!

It’s a great power he has.

Martin looks to be mock scolding Ben or something and it makes me v happy.

Their smiles are electric

(Source: es.pinterest.com)

Tumblr app mystery. There are some people I follow (like RL friends and it’s a mutual follow if that makes a difference) here and I never see their posts in the tumblr app (my phone and my tablet). I think sometimes “gee why isn’t X posting?” so I pull them up in search and lo and behold there they are posting away! This has even happened with my roommate. Is this a bizarre coincidence or is the app a bit off?

corpsereviver2:

Hi all,
Over the next month or so, I’ll be posting a good bit of Halloween things (from goofy to vintage to creepy to pretty but nothing gory). I’m planning on tagging these Halloween if you want to avoid them.

I’m also posting from time to time things about coping with seasonal…

Duh. I just realized last year I came up with a tag for Halloween & similar seasonal stuff: spooky season

So I’ll be using that from Oct 1-31 💀👻🎃🍬🍫

amuseoffyre:

Avengers Assemble: Genderflipped
Gwendoline Christie - Thor
Natalie Dormer - Loki
Gina Torres - Nicola Fury
Lena Headey - Toni Stark/Iron Maiden
Kevin McKidd - Nikolai Romanoff/Black Widower
Lucy Liu - Beth Banner/The Hulk
Jennifer Lawrence - Kit Barton/Hawkeye
Jennifer Morrison - Stephanie Rogers/Captain America


Oooh. I like this lots

amuseoffyre:

Avengers Assemble: Genderflipped

  • Gwendoline Christie - Thor
  • Natalie Dormer - Loki
  • Gina Torres - Nicola Fury
  • Lena Headey - Toni Stark/Iron Maiden
  • Kevin McKidd - Nikolai Romanoff/Black Widower
  • Lucy Liu - Beth Banner/The Hulk
  • Jennifer Lawrence - Kit Barton/Hawkeye
  • Jennifer Morrison - Stephanie Rogers/Captain America

Oooh. I like this lots

(via jahnyanovak)

queeencosima:

↳ 20/50 Sherlock Caps

fashionsfromhistory:

Jacket

1610-1615; Altered 1620

This fine early 17th-century woman’s waistcoat is particularly significant because it is shown being worn in the Portrait of Margaret Layton (museum no. E.214-1994), attributed to Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger (1561-1636) and displayed alongside it. Waistcoats were long-sleeved upper garments, opening down the front and fitted at the waist using inserted gores. They were often made of linen and splendidly decorated as in this example.

Although the waistcoat was made about 1610, the portrait was painted more than 10 years later. By this time, waistlines had risen. Margaret Layton adapted to the new style by raising her petticoat and covering the lower half of the waistcoat.

V&A

(via fashionsfromhistory)

blvckfist-23:

德

blvckfist-23:

(Source: chelqueen, via cadarnle)

trickybonmot:

medievalpoc:

Fiction Week!
Long Hidden: Speculative Fiction From the Margins of History (Review) 
ed. Rose Fox and Daniel José Elder
Short form speculative fiction might be my favorite thing to read. I’ve been an anthology junkie for decades, gobbling up everything from Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling’s Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror to Heavy Metal magazine (I know, I know).
Long Hidden: Speculative Fiction From the Margins of History is absolutely one of the best I’ve ever read. These are the kind of stories I wish each and every anthology was filled with; unusual, haunting, baffling, validating, uplifting. There wasn’t a single tale I’d consider filler. In addition, there is an interior illustration for each story, and they add a lot without being spoiler-y, as can sometimes happen with illustrated anthologies.
Claire Humphrey’s “The Witch of Tarup” seamlessly blends practical magic with assisted communication as it weaves a tapestry of the love that can grow after marriage, and paints complex characters in short, deft strokes. “Medu” by Lisa Bolekaja shows us the American west through the eyes of historically accurate cowboys: African- and Mexican-Americans, including a family whose rough-riding women hide a deadly secret in their hair.
Each story delves into little-known, obscured, or suppressed histories to inspire, horrify, shock and delight: heartbroken zombies in serf rebellions, healing soul-deep schisms  in the aftermath of enslavement, and the importance of posthumous marriages.
Ken Liu’s “Knotting Grass, Holding Ring” and “Marigolds” by L.S. Johnson each deal with the fates of sex workers, the former during one of the most famous conflicts of history, and the latter during one that was censored and suppressed for centuries. Victor LeValle’s “Lone Women” gives us a shockingly delicious horror story served up Willa Cather style. “The Ogres of East Africa” by the skilled talesmith Sofia Samatar draws us into and then breaks us out of a colonial nightmare, while the anthology-finishing “Dance of the White Demons” by Sabrina Vourvoulias exudes mysticism, bitterness, and excruciating hope in equal measure.
If you like history, magic, horror, beauty, and redemption in your speculative fiction, Long Hidden is a must-have for your collection. Long Hidden is available in print, ebook, and Kindle editions; find out where to get your copy at the official site here.

Sounds neat.

Adding to the to-read list!

trickybonmot:

medievalpoc:

Fiction Week!

Long Hidden: Speculative Fiction From the Margins of History (Review)

ed. Rose Fox and Daniel José Elder

Short form speculative fiction might be my favorite thing to read. I’ve been an anthology junkie for decades, gobbling up everything from Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling’s Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror to Heavy Metal magazine (I know, I know).

Long Hidden: Speculative Fiction From the Margins of History is absolutely one of the best I’ve ever read. These are the kind of stories I wish each and every anthology was filled with; unusual, haunting, baffling, validating, uplifting. There wasn’t a single tale I’d consider filler. In addition, there is an interior illustration for each story, and they add a lot without being spoiler-y, as can sometimes happen with illustrated anthologies.

Claire Humphrey’s “The Witch of Tarup” seamlessly blends practical magic with assisted communication as it weaves a tapestry of the love that can grow after marriage, and paints complex characters in short, deft strokes. “Medu” by Lisa Bolekaja shows us the American west through the eyes of historically accurate cowboys: African- and Mexican-Americans, including a family whose rough-riding women hide a deadly secret in their hair.

Each story delves into little-known, obscured, or suppressed histories to inspire, horrify, shock and delight: heartbroken zombies in serf rebellions, healing soul-deep schisms  in the aftermath of enslavement, and the importance of posthumous marriages.

Ken Liu’s “Knotting Grass, Holding Ring” and “Marigolds” by L.S. Johnson each deal with the fates of sex workers, the former during one of the most famous conflicts of history, and the latter during one that was censored and suppressed for centuries. Victor LeValle’s “Lone Women” gives us a shockingly delicious horror story served up Willa Cather style. “The Ogres of East Africa” by the skilled talesmith Sofia Samatar draws us into and then breaks us out of a colonial nightmare, while the anthology-finishing “Dance of the White Demons” by Sabrina Vourvoulias exudes mysticism, bitterness, and excruciating hope in equal measure.

If you like history, magic, horror, beauty, and redemption in your speculative fiction, Long Hidden is a must-have for your collection. Long Hidden is available in print, ebook, and Kindle editions; find out where to get your copy at the official site here.

Sounds neat.

Adding to the to-read list!

welovethebeekeeper:

I had two friends over last night, well they are are still here asleep in the guest bedroom, and the plan was to watch the Sherlock pilot as they had never seen it. They are fans of the show but not in the fandom, so have no knowledge of our metas/thoughts on the series….

This is hilarious (and it’s very johnlock shippy/John’s missus as villain so if that is not your cup of tea, probably not as humorous) but you know, I see how I’d come away with a similar view watching with the sound off especially as I was one who came to the show denying to my friend who gave me her DVDs that this show could possibly be slashy.

(via otp221b)

Tags: funny johnlock

(Source: seki0930, via nana-41175)

kompilator:

After a holiday

The chief advantage to employing Muggleborns, Mycroft had always found, is that so many wizards from old established families did not just simply underestimate them, but sometimes ignored them entirely. It was almost as if the lack of pure blood was as good as an invisibility cloak.

The second advantage was the delight he took in observing the resultant fallout when one of them failed to take proper measure of Anthea.